Outdoor experiential education means that our classrooms are everywhere. At AMS, we try to be outside as much as possible. Our students have many opportunities to gain an appreciation of the natural world among our campus’s 100 acres of farm and wilderness and the surrounding North Carolina mountains.

 

Trips

Middle schoolers seek opportunities to build confidence through physical and social experiences. Our trips provide students with a chance to build relationships in smaller groups, to learn new skills, and to challenge themselves. Students feel responsible to the group, seeing the direct impact of their contributions to each trip’s success.

In addition to numerous day hikes and weekend excursions, our outdoor experiential education program offers three extended trips each year: three days, six days and eight days.

Areas that students frequently visit include:

  • Pisgah National Forest
  • Cherokee National Forests
  • Wilson Creek Wilderness Area
  • Shining Rock Wilderness Area
  • Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest
  • Appalachian Trail
  • Suwannee River (canoeing)
  • C&O Canal (biking)

Farm and Garden

Outdoor experiential education isn’t just about about leisure. It is also about learning how the land provides. Participating in the growth cycle of plants and animals first hand gives them a deeper understanding of where their food come from. As they learn the skills of farming and gardening, they develop a sense of self-reliance and confidence. They are able to do work that matters and has value to their community.

Our sustainable agriculture program keeps our community supplied with abundant nutritious food all year round. Our farm and gardens offer:

  • over 50 varieties of vegetables, fruits and herbs
  • laying hens
  • meat poultry including turkeys and chickens
  • dairy cattle
 

 

 

Work Projects

At AMS, our students are responsible for the care of our campus. Our weekly projects are considered part of our outdoor experiential education. They offer students the opportunity to participate in the upkeep of campus, which deepens their sense of investment in the school. When they repair a broken window or a mend a fence, students build a sense of responsibility to their community and problem-solving skills that empower them to be self-reliant.

Working alongside staff, our students have the opportunity to participate in meaningful work needed by their community. They see the impact of their efforts and enjoy the fruits of their labors. Projects include:

  • wood chopping
  • road maintenance
  • landscaping
  • vehicle maintenance
  • setting up for special events
  • garden and livestock care
  • carpentry
  • plumbing
  • electrical work